Winter Carp Fishing Baits Boosted By Irresistible Homemade Korda Goo Dips!

There are many gimmicks in carp fishing and certainly Korda Goo is such a product which appeals more to angler senses than to fish. I could easily make such product using fluorascien drain cleaner and a cheap flavour. But if you feel you must use such gimmicks you at least deserve to be given the opportunity to improve this visual and smell orientated product so read on now for far better results in winter and summer!

You might think that carp see colours as we humans do but there are many differences which really mean we can exploit carp eyesight in surprising ways but not exactly in way you might expect! Carp vision extends into the infrared and ultraviolet ranges and this means they may well detect heat differences and tone and contrasts in very different ways to humans. I say they may well do because when it comes to carp vision not that many rigorously scientific tests regarding bait tones and colours have been carried out.

Certainly one thing is clear that carp do detect contrast of tones, and under certain light conditions rig materials which appear green in white light appear black and so are not camouflaged at all. White hook baits containing high levels of titanium oxide dye may well work better in darkness or in turbid light conditions due to unknown factors science has yet to determine and not merely factors such as contrast and tone.

Highlighting hook baits using dye can work to make them contrast and stand out more from the visual background clutter. This is in principle similar to exploiting high levels of flavours to help hook baits stand out from background dissolved clutter in the water around carp, such as dissolved minerals, ammonium and so on. So highlighting visually and chemically can help achieve more bites and more fish in various conditions, but no in all.

I say not in all conditions because sometimes it is preferable not to be using particular forms of flavours at all, and certainly on a highly pressured lake such as Rainbow Lake you would be best to use natural flavours and avoid any flavours based on familiar solvent bases which fish may well identify and feed far more warily in the presence of. Certain taste sensitive individual fish may actually avoid such baits completely!

Personally I am not a fan of high levels of dyes in baits for purposes of highlighting them as through many tests involving very potent chemosensory approaches the colour of a bait was proven to be totally irrelevant to results as fish were already acutely sensitised instantly to bait substances in solution and so found baits extremely easily from ranges far outside of visual range.

I am a fan of pigments however and for example if you list the number of beneficial pigments found in spirulina for instance then I think you will be a fan of algae, particularly in winter and spring baits forever more! Used correctly spirulina clouds water so beneficially in the presence of feeding fish that this in itself can be enough to obscure rig materials from visual sensitivities when fish get really close to hooks and hook links etc which tend to reflect at least some light back into the eye, even ambient light at night in shallower water!

So how can you improve a visual flavoured product such as Korda Goo? Well without getting technically into the water reactivity, chemosensory and internal bioactivity sides of things etc, adding CC Moore Feedstim XP liquid and powder will dramatically boost the potency of Korda Goo. However you can improve visual impacts too by for example adding liquid Robin Red, or additional titanium oxide dye.

You might add spirulina, or even hemp protein powder and both of these add dramatically to chemosensory nutritional stimulation and very effectively cloud the water obscuring your hook and rig so you get more hooked fish!

Source by Tim F. Richardson

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